How Washington is throwing away its shot at protecting your privacy

A Republican member of the House has introduced a comprehensive data privacy bill, but Congress is unlikely to ever pass it.

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How Washington is throwing away its shot at protecting your privacy

Major U.S. tech firms press Congress for internet surveillance reforms

Facebook (FB.O), Amazon (AMZN.O) and more than two dozen other U.S. technology companies pressed Congress on Friday to make changes to a broad internet surveillance law, saying they were necessary to improve privacy protections and increase government transparency. The request marks the first significant public effort by Silicon Valley to wade into what is expected to be a contentious debate later the year over the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, parts of which will expire on Dec. 31 unless Congress reauthorizes them. Of particular concern to the technology industry and privacy advocates is Section 702, which allows U.S. intelligence agencies to vacuum up vast amounts of communications from foreigners but also incidentally collects some data belonging to Americans that can be searched by analysts without a warrant.

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Major U.S. tech firms press Congress for internet surveillance reforms

EU questions U.S. over Yahoo email scanning, amid privacy concerns

The European Commission has asked the United States about a secret court order Yahoo used to scan thousands of customer emails for possible terrorism links, following concerns that may have violated a new data transfer pact. Under the Privacy Shield agreement that came into force in August, the United States agreed to limit the collection of and access to Europeans' data stored on U.S. servers because of EU concerns about data privacy and mass U.S. surveillance.

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EU questions U.S. over Yahoo email scanning, amid privacy concerns

Apple lawyer, FBI director face off in Congress on iPhone encryption

By Julia Harte and Julia Edwards WASHINGTON (Reuters) – FBI Director James Comey told a congressional panel on Tuesday that a final court ruling forcing Apple Inc to give the FBI data from an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters would be “potentially precedential” in other cases where the agency might request similar cooperation from technology companies. The remarks were a slight change to Comey's statement last week that ordering Apple to unlock the phone was “unlikely to be a trailblazer” for setting a precedent for other cases.

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Apple lawyer, FBI director face off in Congress on iPhone encryption

Unlocking iPhone would leave millions exposed, Apple to tell Congress

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Unlocking an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters would leave hundreds of millions of Apple Inc device owners vulnerable to cybercriminals and other hackers, the company's top lawyer is expected to tell U.S. lawmakers on Tuesday. In written testimony to the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee released on Monday, Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell reiterated the tech giant's stance that the FBI's request to help access the phone “would set a dangerous precedent for government intrusion on the privacy and safety of its citizens. …

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Unlocking iPhone would leave millions exposed, Apple to tell Congress

Yahoo estimates $64-78 mln restructuring charges, mostly in Q1

(Reuters) – Yahoo Inc estimated that a plan to cut jobs and other restructuring moves would result in pretax charges of $64 million to $78 million, mostly in the first quarter of 2016. Of the total, $40 million to $48 million would be for severance pay and related cash expenditures, the company said in a regulatory filing on Friday. (http://1.usa.gov/1OI6Vnd) Yahoo said on Feb. 2 it would reduce its workforce by 15 percent by the end of 2016 and close offices in Dubai, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Madrid and Milan. The company's shares were up nearly 2 percent at $31. …

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Yahoo estimates $64-78 mln restructuring charges, mostly in Q1

Anonymous hackers target Iceland sites in whaling protest

Activist hackers from the Anonymous collective have claimed responsibility for bringing down five government websites in Iceland in a protest against whale-hunting by the North Atlantic nation. In an anti-whaling video posted on social media, activists called for people to hack websites linked to Iceland to protest persistent commercial hunting despite an international moratorium. On a new Twitter account devoted to the campaign, screenshots showing the sites down were published late on Friday by activists who said they belonged to the loose Anonymous collective.

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Anonymous hackers target Iceland sites in whaling protest

EU wants to give national privacy regulators more clout in new U.S. data pact

By Julia Fioretti BRUSSELS (Reuters) – The European Union wants to enhance the power of the bloc's national privacy regulators in policing a planned new EU-U.S. data pact after the previous one was struck down by a top EU court on concerns about mass U.S. surveillance. Brussels and Washington are locked in negotiations to forge a new framework enabling data transfers from Europe to the United States, which are otherwise subject to cumbersome and lengthy legal processes under EU data protection law. The previous pact, known as Safe Harbour and used by over 4,000 U.S. and European companies, was declared invalid by the European Court of Justice in October because U.S. national security needs trumped the privacy of Europeans' data

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EU wants to give national privacy regulators more clout in new U.S. data pact