Unlocking iPhone would leave millions exposed, Apple to tell Congress

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Unlocking an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters would leave hundreds of millions of Apple Inc device owners vulnerable to cybercriminals and other hackers, the company's top lawyer is expected to tell U.S. lawmakers on Tuesday. In written testimony to the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee released on Monday, Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell reiterated the tech giant's stance that the FBI's request to help access the phone “would set a dangerous precedent for government intrusion on the privacy and safety of its citizens. …

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Unlocking iPhone would leave millions exposed, Apple to tell Congress

Yahoo estimates $64-78 mln restructuring charges, mostly in Q1

(Reuters) – Yahoo Inc estimated that a plan to cut jobs and other restructuring moves would result in pretax charges of $64 million to $78 million, mostly in the first quarter of 2016. Of the total, $40 million to $48 million would be for severance pay and related cash expenditures, the company said in a regulatory filing on Friday. (http://1.usa.gov/1OI6Vnd) Yahoo said on Feb. 2 it would reduce its workforce by 15 percent by the end of 2016 and close offices in Dubai, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Madrid and Milan. The company's shares were up nearly 2 percent at $31. …

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Yahoo estimates $64-78 mln restructuring charges, mostly in Q1

Apple calls FBI iPhone request ‘unprecedented’ in court filing

Apple Inc on Thursday struck back in court against a U.S. government demand that it unlock an encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters, arguing such a move would violate its free speech rights and override the will of Congress. The high-stakes fight between Apple and the government burst into the open last week when the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation obtained a court order requiring Apple to write new software and take other measures to disable passcode protection and allow access to shooter Rizwan Farook's iPhone. The clash has driven to the heart of a long-running debate over how much law enforcement and intelligence officials should be able to monitor digital communications.

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Apple calls FBI iPhone request ‘unprecedented’ in court filing

Sharp, Foxconn chiefs to meet after takeover deal put on hold: source

By Ritsuko Ando and J.R. Wu TOKYO/TAIPEI (Reuters) – The chief executives of Sharp Corp and Foxconn plan to meet on Friday in China, a person familiar with the matter said, a day after the world's largest contract maker of electronic goods put its takeover of the Japanese firm on hold. Shares in Sharp slid 11 percent on Friday after sources said previously undisclosed liabilities were responsible for the last-minute hitch. Just hours after the loss-making display maker announced it had decided to sell a two-thirds stake to Foxconn, the Taiwanese firm said it would not sign the deal until it had clarified some “new material information” from Sharp.

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Sharp, Foxconn chiefs to meet after takeover deal put on hold: source

Unlocking San Bernardino iPhone would be ‘bad for America’: Apple CEO Tim Cook

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Apple CEO Tim Cook on Wednesday said that complying with a court order to help the FBI break into an iPhone belonging to a San Bernardino shooter would be “bad for America,” and set an “offensive” legal precedent. “Some things are hard, and some things are right, and some things are both – this is one of those things,” Cook told ABC News in his first interview since the court order came down last week. (Reporting by Dustin Volz, editing by G Crosse)

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Unlocking San Bernardino iPhone would be ‘bad for America’: Apple CEO Tim Cook

Solid support for Apple in iPhone encryption fight: poll

By Jim Finkle BOSTON (Reuters) – Nearly half of Americans support Apple Inc's decision to oppose a federal court order demanding that it unlock a smartphone used by San Bernardino shooter Rizwan Farook, according to a national online Reuters/Ipsos poll. Forty-six percent of respondents said they agreed with Apple's position, 35 percent said they disagreed and 20 percent said they did not know, according to poll results released on Wednesday. Other questions in the poll showed that a majority of Americans do not want the government to have access to their phone and Internet communications, even if it is done in the name of stopping terror attacks.

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Solid support for Apple in iPhone encryption fight: poll

DOJ seeks to force Apple to extract data from dozen other iPhones: WSJ

(Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department is looking at court orders forcing Apple Inc to help investigators extract data from iPhones in about a dozen undisclosed cases across the country, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing sources. This move comes on the heels of the San Bernardino, California, shooting case. The dozen or so cases are also distinct from San Bernardino in that many of them involve phones using an older Apple operating system, which has fewer security barriers to surmount, the Journal added.

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DOJ seeks to force Apple to extract data from dozen other iPhones: WSJ

Google is shuttering Google Compare – WSJ

(Reuters) – Google is shuttering Google Compare, its U.S. comparison-shopping site for auto insurance, credit cards and mortgages after one year, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday, citing people familiar with the matter. The quick reversal is a setback to the Alphabet unit's efforts to use its enormous reach to provide consumers with niche shopping services and financial-services tools, the Journal said. Google said the service didn't meet its expectations and that the company will now focus on AdWords and future innovations, the paper reported citing the email.

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Google is shuttering Google Compare – WSJ

LG Electronics unwraps first G5 modular smartphone

BARCELONA (Reuters) – LG Electronics showed off its first modular smartphone, with its B&O sound system and wide-angle lens, at the annual Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. A modular smartphone is made out of separate components, which enables users to replace or upgrade certain functions independently. In the G5 smartphone, LG has added the B&O sound system and a 135 degree wide angle lens to lure customers less keen to upgrade to devices only marginally better than the ones they already own. …

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LG Electronics unwraps first G5 modular smartphone

U.S., Apple ratchet up rhetoric in fight over encryption

By Dustin Volz and Julia Edwards WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Department of Justice filed a motion on Friday seeking to compel Apple Inc to comply with a judge's order to unlock the encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters, portraying the tech giant's refusal as a “marketing strategy.” In response, a senior Apple executive, speaking with reporters on condition of anonymity, characterized the Justice Department's filing as an effort to argue its case in the media before the company has a chance to respond. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is seeking the tech company's help to access shooter Syed Rizwan Farook's phone by disabling some of its passcode protections. Another senior Apple executive said Congress is the right place for a debate over encryption, not a courtroom.

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U.S., Apple ratchet up rhetoric in fight over encryption