China vs the World: Smartphone giants face a low-cost threat

If you're in the market for a new smartphone, you might want to give these Chinese handsets a chance.

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China vs the World: Smartphone giants face a low-cost threat

Big Cable broke its promise and you're paying for it

The cable industry promised consumers free apps to replace rented cable boxes. We're still waiting.

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Big Cable broke its promise and you're paying for it

HMD Global launches first Nokia smartphone

HMD Global, the Finnish company that owns the rights to use Nokia's brand on mobile phones, announced on Sunday its first smartphone, targeted for Chinese users with a price of 1,699 yuan ($246). The launch marks the first new smartphone carrying the iconic handset name since 2014 when Nokia Oyj chose to sell its entire handset unit to Microsoft . The new device, Nokia 6, runs on Google's Android platform and is manufactured by Foxconn .

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HMD Global launches first Nokia smartphone

Verizon may shift holiday marketing away from Note 7: spokeswoman

Verizon Communications Inc, the largest U.S. wireless carrier, may shift marketing away from Samsung Electronics Co Ltd's troubled Galaxy Note 7 mobile phone heading into the critical holiday selling season, a company spokeswoman said on Monday. Samsung, the world's largest smartphone maker, announced a global recall of at least 2.5 million of its flagship Note 7 smartphones in 10 markets in early September due to faulty batteries causing some phones to catch fire. There have also been reports that replacement phones have caught fire.

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Verizon may shift holiday marketing away from Note 7: spokeswoman

U.S. tells consumers to stop using fire-prone Samsung phones

By Se Young Lee and Jeffrey Dastin SEOUL/NEW YORK (Reuters) – A U.S. government safety agency on Friday urged all consumers to stop using Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones, which are prone to catch fire, and top airlines globally banned their use during flights. Following reports that the phones' batteries have combusted during charging and normal use, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said it was working on an official recall of the devices and that users should turn them off in the meantime. Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said it was working with the agency and asked customers to immediately turn in their Note 7 phones.

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U.S. tells consumers to stop using fire-prone Samsung phones