Microsoft Surface Laptop review: A great notebook with one small flaw

The back-to-school shopping season is just around the corner, and Microsoft (MSFT) is hoping its new Surface Laptop will be the computer you or your child brings to the classroom. Starting at $999, the Surface Laptop is Microsoft’s attempt to fight back against the growing popularity of Google’s (GOOG, GOOGL) low-cost Chromebooks and Apple’s (AAPL) own MacBook line. The Surface Laptop also marks the debut of Microsoft’s new Windows 10 S operating system, a more security- and performance-minded variant of Windows 10.

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Microsoft Surface Laptop review: A great notebook with one small flaw

Technology firms to urge Trump to alter U.S. travel ban: sources

(Reuters) – Several technology companies plan to send a letter to U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday urging his administration to follow through on proposed changes to a travel ban on seven mainly Muslim nations, sources familiar with the letter said Sunday. “We welcome the changes your administration has made in recent days in how the Department of Homeland Security will implement the Executive Order,” according to a draft of the letter. The technology companies expected to sign the letter include Apple Inc, Facebook Inc, Alphabet Inc's Google, Twitter Inc, Microsoft Corp and Yahoo Inc. The sources did not want to be identified because discussions regarding the letter were ongoing.

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Technology firms to urge Trump to alter U.S. travel ban: sources

Qualcomm misses revenue estimates, defends licensing model

(Reuters) – Qualcomm Inc reported a lower-than-expected 3.9 percent rise in quarterly revenue on Wednesday, and defended its licensing model in the face of multiple legal challenges over its alleged “anticompetitive” tactics. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission and Apple Inc have sued Qualcomm accusing it of resorting to “anticompetitive” tactics to maintain a monopoly over chips used in smartphone. Apple also filed a lawsuit against Qualcomm in Beijing on Wednesday, alleging that the chip supplier abused its clout and is seeking 1 billion yuan ($145.32 million) in damages.

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Qualcomm misses revenue estimates, defends licensing model

U.S. appeals court revives antitrust lawsuit against Apple

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – iPhone app purchasers may sue Apple Inc over allegations that the company monopolized the market for iPhone apps by not allowing users to purchase them outside the App Store, leading to higher prices, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Thursday. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling revives a long-simmering legal challenge originally filed in 2012 taking aim at Apple’s practice of only allowing iPhones to run apps purchased from its own App Store. A group of iPhone users sued saying the Cupertino, California, company's practice was anticompetitive.

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U.S. appeals court revives antitrust lawsuit against Apple

Canada’s competition watchdog closes two-year Apple probe

Canada's Competition Bureau on Friday said it had not found sufficient evidence that Apple Inc had engaged in anti-competitive conduct, closing a two-year investigation into the iPhone maker. The watchdog launched a probe into Apple's business practices in December 2014 to investigate allegations the company's Canadian unit had used anti-competitive clauses to force domestic operators to sell rival devices at higher prices than they otherwise would have and restricting how they could market and sell iPhones. “The Bureau did not find evidence to suggest that the Apple terms resulted in a significant effect on competition,” the antitrust watchdog said in a statement.

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Canada’s competition watchdog closes two-year Apple probe

Exclusive: China’s ZTE to slash about 3,000 jobs – sources

By Sijia Jiang HONG KONG (Reuters) – Chinese telecom equipment maker ZTE , which is facing U.S. trade sanctions that could severely disrupt its supply chain, is slashing about 3,000 jobs, including a fifth of positions in its struggling handset business in China, company sources said. Its global handset operations will shed 600 jobs, or 10 percent of the total, with the cuts concentrated in China, where it has been losing market share. “Cuts in the handset business in China will be beyond 20 percent,” said a senior executive who has been briefed on the lay-offs, which are scheduled to be completed within the first quarter.

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Exclusive: China’s ZTE to slash about 3,000 jobs – sources

With bylaw tweaks, Apple grants activist one of three wishes

By Ross Kerber and Stephen Nellis BOSTON/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Apple Inc's board relaxed some rules for director nominations by outside investors but stopped short of broader changes sought by an activist shareholder. Just how much influence to give such investors has been a hot topic with the rise of activist shareholders who some executives fear may not have long-term corporate interests at heart. At Apple, this debate played out several years ago when billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn successfully urged an increase in share buybacks.

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With bylaw tweaks, Apple grants activist one of three wishes

Apple says iPhone 6 battery fires in China likely caused by external factors

Apple Inc said external factors were the likely cause of iPhone 6 battery fires detailed in a Chinese consumer protection report that featured widely in state media earlier this week and created a buzz on social media. The Shanghai Consumer Council released a report on Friday detailing battery fires in eight iPhone 6 handsets. It also detailed iPhone 6 handsets powering down before their batteries are depleted – handsets outside of a global iPhone 6 recall range that Apple announced on Nov. 20 to address the issue.

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Apple says iPhone 6 battery fires in China likely caused by external factors

U.S. Supreme Court backs Samsung in smartphone fight with Apple

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with Samsung in its big-money smartphone patent fight with Apple, throwing out an appeals court ruling that the South Korean company had to pay a $399 million penalty to its American rival for copying key iPhone designs. The justices sent the case back to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington to determine how much Samsung must pay. Apple spokesman Josh Rosenstock said in a statement that the U.S. company remained “optimistic that the lower courts will again send a powerful signal that stealing isn't right.” Samsung told Reuters in a statement the ruling was a “victory for Samsung and for all those who promote creativity, innovation and fair competition in the marketplace.” Following a 2012 jury verdict favoring Apple, Samsung initially was hit with nearly $930 million in penalties, later cut by $382 million, for infringing Apple's iPhone patents and mimicking its distinctive appearance in making the Galaxy and other competing devices.

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U.S. Supreme Court backs Samsung in smartphone fight with Apple

Apple shows ambition to get into self-driving car race

By David Shepardson WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Apple Inc is wading in to the debate over regulation of self-driving cars, declaring it is excited about the potential for automated transportation and calling on U.S. regulators not to restrict testing of such vehicles. A five-page letter from Steve Kenner, Apple's director of product integrity, to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is the company's most comprehensive statement yet about its interest in self-driving vehicle technology. “Executed properly under NHTSA's guidance, automated vehicles have the potential to greatly enhance the human experience — to prevent millions of car crashes and thousands of fatalities each year and to give mobility to those without.” Apple urged regulators not to impose too many restrictions on testing of self-driving cars, saying “established manufacturers and new entrants should be treated equally.” Since software would decide what actions to take in potentially dangerous situations, Apple said certain areas need special attention.

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Apple shows ambition to get into self-driving car race